Sunday, February 19, 2006

Really, I Just Blog for the Interviews ...

If nothing else, the Financial Times' Trevor Butterworth finds some out-of-the-ordinary - even titillating - metaphors to present his view of the practice of blogging, its advocates and its critics, its strengths and its weaknesses, its impact and its future ...

For example ... "Which brings us to the spectre haunting the blogosphere - tedium. If the pornography of opinion doesn't leave you longing for an eroticism of fact, the vast wasteland of verbiage produced by the relentless nature of blogging is the single greatest impediment to its seriousness as a medium."

Go, refill your coffee cup, settle down, and
CLICK HERE for Butterworth's entire essay. Later, I'd like to know what you think of some of the points he makes.

*****
With thanks to James Marcus at House of Mirth for the heads-up ...

1 comment:

Eric said...

Jeff, I've never subscribed to the theory that blogging would supplant the MSM in any meaningful fashion, nor have I ever viewed blogs as a primary source of information (except for those which are geared toward technical issues...a whole different ballgame). If there's any disappointment in what blogging has brought to the online world, I think it's due to unrealistic expectations, not any inherent failure on the part of bloggers.

As to those people who had hoped to get rich by blogging, perhaps they just need to be patient and wait for The Next Big Thing.

This is an interesting essay and I appreciate your calling it to our attention. What it really stimulates me to think about is not why blogging has proven to be so unsuccessful, but why it's proven to be so successful. Nano-communities are being formed around blogs; social networks are being created in amazing ways...and none of it (or very little, I'd guess) has to do with making money, influencing the government or public opinion, or anything more lofty than enjoying a conversation with people for whom a virtual fondness has developed. That's the real story, in my opinion.